Special Sessions

The scientific committee of the MedGU-24 invites research papers on all cross-cutting themes of Earth and planetary sciences, with a main focus on these Conference Tracks.

Submissions for additional conference tracks (e.g., special sessions) are solicited from the scientific community by March 31, 2024.

If you are interested in proposing a special session, please follow this example and send your proposal to contact@medgu.org.

Click on each special session to learn more about its scope:



Special Session on Tsunami Sources, Hazards, Risk and Uncertainties (Track 14)

MedGU-24 hosts a special session and expert meeting focused on specific regions of the Mediterranean and the world with significant exposure to tsunami risk in an effort to address tsunami exposure and vulnerability of coastal populations along some of the most tsunamigenic zones. This session will address tsunami hazards associated with subduction zones, assess the current state of seismic and tsunami instrumentation, which may be lacking and prevent experts from identifying worst-case scenarios for non-seismic sources, and evaluate the level of tsunami readiness of at-risk populations. Experts are especially encouraged to submit their most current research and participate in the session with their cutting-edge understanding of local tectonics to identify some of the worst-case earthquake scenarios for the Mediterranean region and the world.

More information to follow shortly.

Conveners

  • Arnau Folch

    Arnau Folch

    Geociencias Barcelona (GEO3BCN-CSIC)
    Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC)
    Barcelona, Spain
    Email: afolch@geo3bcn.csic.es
    scopus preview



Special Session on Recent Earthquakes of the Mediterranean Regions (Track 15)

Two large earthquakes, the Kahramanmaraş seismic sequence (Southern Turkiye, Mw 7.8 & 7.6) and the High Atlas earthquake (Southern Morocco, Mw 6.8) took place in 2023. Both earthquake sequences caused severe damage and casualties in regions with dense population. Impressive 350-km-long surface ruptures with complex structural faulting along the East Anatolian Fault and its branches characterize the Kahramanmaraş earthquakes and its 8–9 mm/yr left-lateral rate of faulting. The High Atlas earthquake on the other hand revealed surface deformation with blind faulting along 50-km-long rupture of the southern Sahara suture zone of the Maghrebides ranges. The modeling of coseismic ruptures using GPS and InSAR data allow the constrain of the fault ruptures at depth and related large scale crustal deformation. Slip deficit and fault interaction illustrate the short and long term behavior of these seismically active zones with slip rates from cm down to sub mm. We invite contributions in earthquake faulting, earthquake geodesy (GPS and InSAR), paleoseismology, seismotectonics, structural geology and tomography for the understanding of seismic cycles and crustal deformation in different tectonic frameworks (e.g., strike-slip, thrust faulting, normal faulting).

Conveners

  • Ziyadin Çakir

    Ziyadin Çakir

    Department of Geological Engineering, Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey
    Email: ziyadin.cakir@itu.edu.tr
    scopus preview

  • Fida Medina

    Fida Medina

    Moroccan Association of Geosciences, Commission of Natural Hazards, Agdal, Rabat, Morocco
    Email: medinafida@yahoo.com
    scopus preview

  • Abdelhakim Ayadi

    Abdelhakim Ayadi

    Centre de Recherche en Astronomie Astrophysique et Géophysique (CRAAG), Algiers, Algeria
    Email: abdelhakim.ayadi@gmail.com
    scopus preview

  • Mourad Bezzeghoud

    Mourad Bezzeghoud

    Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Évora, Évora, Portugal
    Earth and Remote Sensing Laboratory, University of Évora, Évora, Portugal
    Email: mourad@uevora.pt
    scopus preview

  • Mustapha Meghraoui

    Mustapha Meghraoui

    Associate Editor, Mediterranean Geosciences Reviews (Springer)
    Associate Editor, Arabian Journal of Geosciences (Springer)
    Emeritus Professor, IPG Strasbourg, France
    Email: m.meghraoui@unistra.fr
    scopus preview



Special Session on Earthquake Source and Ground Motion Modeling for Seismic Hazard and Risk Assessment (Track 16)

The characteristics of active fault movements are essential for estimating the earthquake potential in a complex geological setting. Researchers have conducted several studies using different datasets and methods to rapidly understand seismogenesis and its corresponding impact. Accumulated data have been providing very important knowledge about the rupture processes of earthquakes, propagation paths and site effects on ground motion, and the relation between ground motion, damage, and earthquakes. This session focuses on earthquake sources and the methods and applications of physics-based earthquake ground motion simulations capable of handling wave propagation at frequencies of seismic engineering interest in the framework of seismic hazard and risk assessment. We invite contributions drawing on advances in knowledge of earthquake kinematic and dynamic rupture processes, including wave path and site effects representations using velocity models with multi-scale variability (with linear and non-linear material properties). We also seek contributions to the development of non-ergodic ground-motion models combining recorded and simulated data and their associated implications for probabilistic seismic hazard models in different regions of the world. Applications of these methodologies in the framework of seismic hazard and risk assessment of urban areas are welcome.

Conveners

  • José Fernando Borges

    José Fernando Borges

    Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Évora, Évora, Portugal
    Earth and Remote Sensing Laboratory, University of Évora, Évora, Portugal
    Email: jborges@uevora.pt
    scopus preview

  • Abdelhakim Ayadi

    Abdelhakim Ayadi

    Centre de Recherche en Astronomie Astrophysique et Géophysique (CRAAG), Algiers, Algeria
    Email: abdelhakim.ayadi@gmail.com
    scopus preview

  • Mustapha Meghraoui

    Mustapha Meghraoui

    Associate Editor, Mediterranean Geosciences Reviews (Springer)
    Associate Editor, Arabian Journal of Geosciences (Springer)
    Emeritus Professor, IPG Strasbourg, France
    Email: m.meghraoui@unistra.fr
    scopus preview

  • Mourad Bezzeghoud

    Mourad Bezzeghoud

    Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Évora, Évora, Portugal
    Earth and Remote Sensing Laboratory, University of Évora, Évora, Portugal
    Email: mourad@uevora.pt
    scopus preview



Special Session on Biogeosciences and Global Environmental Change (Track 17)

MedGU-24 hosts a special session on biogeosciences and global environmental change. Biogeosciences, the interdisciplinary field that integrates biological, geological, and chemical processes to understand Earth systems, faces several challenges in the context of global environmental change. Some of these challenges are well known, such as climate change, land use and land cover change, deforestation and land degradation, nitrogen and phosphorus pollution, invasive species, and biodiversity loss or ocean acidification, among others. But there are other threats that need to be addressed in the short term. We refer to aspects such as feedback mechanisms: many biogeoscience processes are interconnected, and changes in one aspect can trigger feedback loops that amplify or dampen the effects of environmental change. Understanding and predicting these feedback mechanisms is critical for accurate modeling of future environmental scenarios. Human-wildlife conflicts: As human populations expand and encroach on natural habitats, human-wildlife conflicts escalate. Finding sustainable solutions to mitigate these conflicts while conserving biodiversity is a major challenge for biogeoscientists and conservationists. Data gaps and uncertainties: Despite advances in technology and scientific understanding, there are still significant gaps in our knowledge of biogeoscientific processes, particularly in remote or inaccessible regions. Filling these gaps and reducing uncertainty in environmental predictions is essential for effective decision-making and policy development. Meeting these challenges requires collaboration across disciplines, integration of data from multiple sources, and innovative approaches to research, monitoring, and conservation efforts.

We invite interested participants to write an intention email to one of the convenors.

Conveners